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With the U.S. Women’s National Team winning the 2019 World Cup as expected, they have been in non-stop celebrate mode and making the media rounds to boast about their accomplishment and to further their activism.

At the end of their 2-0 win over Netherlands, the crowd chanted “Equal Pay!” It’s a popular cry from their roster and the social justice types without really any comprehension of how revenue and the market work.

So it was interesting when the financial numbers were finally released and it revealed that the Women’s World Cup generated $131 million. It’s quite the contrast to the $6 billion that the Men’s World Cup generated last year. What will also be conveniently ignored is the fact that despite this, the women get a higher share of the tournament’s profits than the men do.

Whether it’s out of fear of having to be politically correct or just a complete devotion to delusion, many do not want to face the reality that the interest and viewership of women’s athletics isn’t there. It’s not even close to men’s athletics and that’s certainly the case in women’s soccer, which no one watches or even discusses except once every four years.

Newsflash to those still in the dark, men and women are different. There’s a huge difference in strength and speed between the two. There’s a reason why they don’t face each other in the octagon. There’s a reason why one plays baseball and one plays softball. There’s a reason why they use a smaller ball and have softer rules in women’s basketball. When you take a man and a woman in their respective sport in which they are trained, men are athletically superior. This shouldn’t be considered controversial.

To put into perspective just how different males and females are in sports, take a look at what happened when the U.S. women’s National Team played an Under-15 boys FC Dallas squad in 2017. The World Cup champions lost to the teenagers 5-2. That’s not an anomaly. The Australian women’s soccer team lost 7-0 to a group of 15-under boys as well in 2016.

 I brought this example up to a sports journalism professor I had in college when he was in full “woke” mode and tried to argue that if you preferred to watch the NBA over the WNBA, it was a matter of sexism and simply a lack of exposure to the sport.

Never mind the fact that the NBA completely subsidizes the WNBA simply because no one cares enough to watch it. Nope. It must be a conspiracy to deliberately hold back such a quality product. I’m sure he holds the same belief about UConn’s women’s basketball team (the best program in the sport) after their annual report in 2018 showed the women’s team had a deficit of $3 million in operating cost.

A local sports writer in my hometown was furious when attendance for the girl’s high school basketball tournament was extremely poor compared to the boy’s state tournament the week earlier. It says a lot about agenda-driven writers when they get upset that others choose to use their free will to do or watch something other than what the writer thinks they should.

When public interest is there, the evidence shows revenue will follow. Look at how Ronda Rousey’s popularity exploded in UFC and WWE. No one was trying to hold her back. She was good at what she did and fans wanted to watch her.

Let’s chill out on the activism and come back to reality. Suggesting women’s sports are an inferior product and lack the interest that their male counterparts generate (and are paid less as a result), isn’t something that needs to be whispered. It’s should be a universal truth.